An Affair to Remember – “The Oath” Awarded MWSA Silver Medal

Military Writers Society of America
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Some of you are probably too young to recall the movie An Affair to Remember, starring Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr. If you haven’t seen it, I recommend you check it out on Turner Classic Movies. It’s said to be the most romantic movie of all time. A real tear-jerker.

What, you ask, does a Cary Grant film have to do with my novel being awarded a Silver Medal by the prestigious Military Writers Society of America a week ago? Well for me it was, indeed, an affair to remember (and, since I choked up when the award was announced, I guess you could also say it was a real tear-jerker). Continue reading

It’s Gonna be a Bright, Bright Sunshiny Day

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I hadn’t sung, or even thought about, Johnny Nash’s hit song “I Can See Clearly Now” in about forty years. But I did this morning. That’s when I woke up, turned on my computer, and saw that the Military Writers Society of America had placed my novel, The Oath, second on the list for their Recommended Reading List. Continue reading

Recently Uncovered Data May Support Theory that Custer Survived

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Associated Press  (June 21, 2017)

This coming Sunday, June 25th, in the year 1876, Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer was killed, along with five companies of the Seventh Cavalry who rode with him, at the Battle of the Little Bighorn —

… Or was he?

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Custer to Attend Wild Deadwood Reads This Summer

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Lt. Colonel George Armstrong Custer has agreed to come with me to Wild Deadwood Reads in South Dakota on June 10th.

This isn’t the only time Custer has been in Black Hills country. Way back in July of 1874, President Ulysses S. Grant issued orders for Custer to scout a suitable site for a military post in the Black Hills. Custer himself told me his big mistake was bringing along those two prospectors. It had been rumored for years that the Black Hills were rich in gold, and those damn prospectors found it. “The beginning of the end,” he told me in genuine sorrow, “of the Plains Indians and their way of life.” Continue reading